Saturday Summation – 14 July 2012

Here are some of my most interesting blog and news reads of the week.

Writing Stuff:

Pretty much all writing stuff this week, with maybe one crossover piece into reading:

I got a kick out of this article from the Huffington Post about categorizing book characters by their Myers-Briggs psychosocial profile. (“16 Fiction Book Characters’ Myers-Briggs Personality Types”) A lot of extra fun can be had with this activity if you are looking to delve into a character more – either as a reader or writer. I mean, I probably wouldn’t do this as a reader unless I wanted to write some fun paper for a class or something, but others might get a kick out trying to analyze characters this way for fun. If, as a writer, you are into doing a lot of character development exercises, having your character take the Myers-Briggs test might be a really fun way to go. Or, of course, it could simply be a major distraction from actual writing. Ha!

I recently started to read a book review where in the first paragraph, the reviewer says “It needs a copy edit and displays many of the traits which will irritate those who appreciate the value of a traditional editorial team.” He then indicated that if you could forgive this, then it would be a great read. I did not even bother to read the rest of the review because that statement embodies a great deal about what irritates me about the current state of self-publishing. It also spurred an interesting conversation with my husband about the importance of proper grammar in writing and where we currently fall within the grammar continuum as a society. He passed along this article from cbsnews.com that made me feel a little better about what, hopefully, is still truly the “norm” for proper writing expectations. “Does Grammar Matter Anymore?”

Dialogue is one of my most favorite things to write in fiction, but it can be very difficult. With my young, developing writers it is probably the most difficult thing to write. There are a great deal of excellent articles, blog posts, and so forth out on the web for dialogue-writing advice, but I did like this on that I came across this week from literary agent Sarah LaPolla because it gives big idea advice that is easy to keep in the back of your head as you approach dialogue rather than nitty gritty details. “Is This Meaningful Dialogue?’ She Asked”.

Finally, another “be true to yourself” kind of post about writing. The best piece of advice from Ollin Morales’s post, “What Writers Should Do When Drawing a Blank” is to stop trying to write like someone else. Let yourself be unencumbered and write like you.

Video of the Week:

This song spoof video rapidly made the rounds this week – my 5-yr old is a big fan of Cookie Monster, which is probably the only reason I originally watched this in the first place. I had only heard the original version of the song for the first time a few days before I saw this, in spite of “hearing” about it all over Twitter, primarily. Anyhow… even if you don’t know the original song, you can still get a kick out of Cookie Monster hoping you’ll share a cookie, maybe:

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4 Responses to Saturday Summation – 14 July 2012

  1. Never heard the original song and the video for Call Me Maybe is pretty cute / funny.

    Like

  2. Jen (@JSQ79) says:

    I really appreciate the dialogue link…and the Cookie monster video is the best thing I’ve seen all week (I admit to loving Call Me Maybe).

    Like

  3. Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist says:

    I are think that well post.

    Like

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